Moat Vale Campsite 
A bit about us & our photo gallery

Life at Moat Vale

We are a 10 acre small-holding, virtually on the Scottish/English border of Cumbria – within THE DEBATABLE LANDS, 12 miles from Carlisle and 7 miles from Gretna Green. Our land is divided into 4 fields.  In winter of 2012 we planted up a new woodland in one of the fields, with sheep grazing and meadow grass in the others. We keep laying and meat hens, and grow as much of our own veg and fruit as we can in our vegetable garden and polytunnel.

Moat Vale & Roundabout: photo gallery

The campsite overlooks our land, so you’ll see all the goings on of the seasons. Lambing, clipping, hay-making, weeding, harvesting, egg collecting – we’re happy to lend you a hoe if you’re missing your garden. You are welcome to walk through our pasture, meadow and newly planted woodland . Dogs can be exercised off the lead in fields without sheep.

We have a pretty relaxed attitude to life in general, and we would like you to feel at home on our caravan site. There is  plenty of room in the field for ball games and the bairns to run around.  

We are a very handy and peaceful overnight stop if you’re heading further north from further south, and vice versa. But. why not stop a while longer and discover what’s going on in THE DEBATABLE LANDS ?

 

THE DEBATABLE LANDS included the barony of Kirkandrews,. They were around ten miles long from north to south and four miles wide. For over three hundred years they were controlled by local clans, such as the Armstrongs, who successfully resisted any attempt by the Scottish or English governments to impose their authority. The Armstrongs alone could put 3,000 men in the field. They launched frequent raids on farms and settlements outside the Debatable Lands, the profits enabling them to become major landowners. In 1530, King James V  broke the strength of the Armstrongs by hanging Johnnie Armstrong of Gilnockie and thirty-one others. In 1551 the Crown officers of England and Wales, in an attempt to clear out the trouble makers, declared that "All Englishmen and Scottishmen shall be free to rob, burn, spoil, slay, murder and destroy all and every such persons, their bodies, buildings, goods and cattle as do remain or shall inhabit upon any part of the said Debatable Land.” In 1552 a border line was agreed by commissioners, and soon after the Scots' Dyke was built to mark the line; this did not, however, stop the lawlessness. When the thrones of Scotland and England were united in 1603, King James VI of Scotland also became James I of England, and he embarked on the so-called "Pacification of the Borders", purging the Border reivers, destroying their fortified tower houses, rounding up their families and sending them to Ireland and elsewhere................ or so he thought.

 

Home.
About Us.
Booking Form.
Directions.
Things to do.
Home.
About Us.
Booking Form.
Directions.
Things to do.